antiseptic

Patchouli essential oil (Pogostemon cablin) is unmistakable, and for those of a certain generation its sweet earthy aroma will often trigger happy memories of the 1960’s and early 1970’s. Adopted by the counterculture that began in the USA and quickly swept the western world, patchouli will be forever associated with hippies, psychedelia, Hare Krishna and marijuana; although not necessarily all of those or in that order!
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Article by Geoff Lyth | Profiles - Essential Oils | Tags: , , , , , | Wednesday, January 8th, 2014 - 1:11

This particular type of cedarwood essential oil is known botanically as Juniperus virginiana, and strictly speaking this species is not considered a true cedar. As the botanical name indicates it is part of the genus Juniper, which belongs to the Cupressaceae family. There are several cedarwood essential oils extracted from trees of the Cupressaceae family, but few are used much in aromatherapy.
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Article by Geoff Lyth | Profiles - Essential Oils | Tags: , , , , , | Monday, October 7th, 2013 - 6:10

Myrrh essential oil is derived from an oleo-gum resin which is secreted naturally from the trunk of Commiphora myrrha trees when they are wounded or lacerated. There are almost 60 species of Commiphora found throughout Africa and Arabia, and although several produce an oleo-gum resin, Commiphora myrrha is the species of choice for producing the myrrh essential oil used in aromatherapy.
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Article by Geoff Lyth | Profiles - Essential Oils | Tags: , , , , , | Wednesday, December 5th, 2012 - 8:04

Elemi is a soft, fragrant oleoresin obtained from the trunk of Canarium luzonicum trees, and elemi essential oil is extracted from this oleoresin. For over 100 years the name ‘elemi’ was used as a collective term for a number of oleoresins derived from several botanical species and geographical origins. However today, ‘elemi’ generally relates only to oleoresin and extracted essential oil originating from the Philippines, which is known and traded internationally as Manila elemi. Read more…

Article by Geoff Lyth | Profiles - Essential Oils | Tags: , , , , , | Friday, September 7th, 2012 - 9:26

The cinnamon tree belongs to the Lauraceae family and provides commerce with two different oils; cinnamon leaf essential oil and cinnamon bark essential oil. The former oil is the type used in aromatherapy, whereas oil from the bark contains a very high concentration of cinnamic aldehyde which is a powerful skin irritant, therefore this particular type of cinnamon oil should not be used in aromatherapy.
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Article by Geoff Lyth | Profiles - Essential Oils | Tags: , , , , , | Monday, August 6th, 2012 - 12:03

Lemon essential oil is popular in aromatherapy because it has a wonderful, fresh aroma, delivers an impressively large number of health benefits, and is extremely inexpensive. Few essential oils offer the same versatility within the same price range of lemon, and this is probably due to the fact that the fruit and essential oil is produced on a grand scale. After sweet orange, lemon probably ranks second (or joint second with grapefruit) as the most commercially important citrus fruit. Read more…

German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) is a flowering medicinal plant that has truly stood the test of time, with over 2,000 years of documented medical use by luminaries such as Asclepius, Galen, Hippocrates and Culpepper. It would be almost impossible to find a herbal book published during the past 500 years that does not include the virtues of this amazing healing herb. Read more…

Pines are coniferous trees belonging to the genus Pinus, which comprises of about 120 different species that are divided into 3 sub-genera based on cone, leaf and seed characteristics. Over 140 varieties of Pinus sylvestris have previously been described and catalogued in botanical references, but after reclassification only 4 varieties of this species are currently acknowledged as being genetically distinct. The species normally used in aromatherapy is Pinus sylvestris var. sylvestris, which is also known as Scots pine. Read more…

Article by Geoff Lyth | Profiles - Essential Oils | Tags: , , | Friday, September 9th, 2011 - 7:21

Largely ignored for 9 months out of the year here in the United Kingdom, citronella essential oil is currently enjoying its 3 months reign as king of the insect repellent oils. This seems such a shame, because although it is very effective in this role it could hardly be considered mainstream aromatherapy, and yet the oil is capable of delivering so much more therapeutically. Let’s look at the background of this essential oil and see what else it has to offer in aromatherapy. Read more…

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